Tutorials » Tutorial

Build a Movie Emoji Quiz App with Remix, Fauna, and Clerk

Estimated time: 30 min.

Ian McPhail

Ian McPhail

Project setup

A fun challenge coming out of the modern smartphone world is to identify a movie based only on a sequence of emoji. Sometimes the emoji “spell out” the words in the title, while other times they identify key plot themes. Test the emoji game of all the movie buffs you know by building a Movie Emoji Quiz app.

In this tutorial, we will build the app using the Remix full-stack web framework, a Fauna database, and Clerk for authentication and user management. Remix is a relatively new, open-source framework for React that has been gaining traction. Fauna is a developer-friendly, cloud-based database platform that offers modern features, such as real-time streaming and GraphQL. Clerk, an authentication provider built for the modern web, has a first-party Remix authentication package and integrates with Fauna through its JWT templates feature.

A brief web search didn't come up with any existing Remix and Fauna tutorials. And then I found this tweet from Ryan Florence (@ryanflorence), the co-founder of Remix:

That sold me on moving forward in building with this stack.

If you would like to skip ahead, you can see the completed codebase and demo here.

Assumptions

This tutorial makes the following assumptions...

  • Basic command line usage
  • Node.js (≥ v14) installed with npm (≥ v7)
  • Experience with React components and hooks
  • Clerk and Fauna accounts already set up (if you haven’t done so, do it now... we’ll wait)

Set up a Clerk application

The first step is to create a new application from the Clerk dashboard. We’ll name this application Movie Emoji Quiz and leave the default Password authentication strategy selected. We’re also going to choose Google and Twitter as the social login providers, but feel free to select whichever ones you and your friends use.

Choose your authentication settings

Click the Add application button and your Clerk development instance will be created.

Create Remix project

The next step is to create the Remix project. Run the following command in your terminal:

npx create-remix movie-emoji-quiz

It may prompt you to install the create-remix package. Then respond with the following:

? What type of app do you want to create? Just the basics
? Where do you want to deploy? Remix App Server
? Do you want me to run `npm install`? Yes

It will then ask “TypeScript or JavaScript?”, we’re going with JavaScript on this one, but that’s up to your personal preference.

As the instructions state, change into the app directory with cd movie-emoji-quiz/

Now install the two dependencies we need for this application:

npm install @clerk/remix faunadb

Next, touch .env to create an environment variables file and replace <YOUR_FRONTEND_API> and <YOUR_CLERK_API_KEY> with their respective values from your Clerk instance, which you can get from the API keys page.

.env
CLERK_FRONTEND_API=<YOUR_FRONTEND_API>
CLERK_API_KEY=<YOUR_CLERK_API_KEY>

Once those environment variables are set, spin up the Remix dev server:

npm run dev

Set up Clerk authentication

To share authentication state with Remix routes, we need to make three modifications to the app/root.jsx file:

  1. Export rootAuthLoader as loader
  2. Export ClerkCatchBoundary as CatchBoundary
  3. Wrap the default export with ClerkApp
app/root.jsx
1
import { rootAuthLoader } from "@clerk/remix/ssr.server";
2
import { ClerkApp, ClerkCatchBoundary } from "@clerk/remix";
3
4
export const loader = args => rootAuthLoader(args); /* 1 */
5
export const CatchBoundary = ClerkCatchBoundary(); /* 2 */
6
7
function App() {
8
return <html lang="en">{/*...*/}</html>;
9
}
10
11
export default ClerkApp(App); /* 3 */

Clerk supports Remix SSR out-of-the-box.

Set up Fauna database

From the Fauna dashboard, create a new database. We named ours emoji-movie-quiz and chose the Classic Region Group.

We only need to create one Collection for this application. You can do so either in the Dashboard UI or in the interactive query shell.

To do it in the shell, type the following:

CreateCollection({ name: "challenge" })

Then press the Run query button. If it was successful, you should see similar output.

CreateCollection FQL query

We’re going to seed the database with a few examples to get started. If you’ve never used the Fauna Query Language (FQL) before, the syntax may look a little funny.

1
Map(
2
[
3
{ emoji: "🔕🐑🐑🐑", title: "Silence of the Lambs" },
4
{ emoji: "💍💍💍💍⚰️", title: "Four Weddings and a Funeral" },
5
{ emoji: "🏝🏐", title: "Castaway" },
6
{ emoji: "👽📞🏡", title: "E.T." },
7
{ emoji: "👂👀👃👅✋6️⃣", title: "The Sixth Sense" }
8
],
9
Lambda("data", Create(Collection("challenge"), { data: Var("data") } ))
10
)

This will map over the examples array and create a new document with challenge data for each item in the Challenge collection.

To learn more about FQL, check out the Fauna docs and this handy cheat sheet.

You can navigate to the Collections tab to validate that the data is all set. You can even make edits directly from the user interface if you prefer.

Collections tab

While we’re here, let’s navigate over to the Functions tab and write a couple FQL functions we will need later.

Click the New Function button, name it getChallenges, and then paste the following function body:

1
Query(
2
Lambda(
3
[],
4
Map(
5
Paginate(Documents(Collection("challenge"))),
6
Lambda(
7
"challenge",
8
Let(
9
{
10
challengeRef: Get(Var("challenge")),
11
data: Select("data", Var("challengeRef")),
12
refId: Select(["ref", "id"], Var("challengeRef"))
13
},
14
Merge(Var("data"), { id: Var("refId") })
15
)
16
)
17
)
18
)
19
)

This function will get all the challenges and include the unique document ID inside each data object.

You can test out the functionality in the Shell by running:

Call("getChallenges")

The second function we’re going to define is called getChallengeById and will take the unique document ID parameter and return the respective challenge data or null if it doesn’t exist.

1
Query(
2
Lambda(
3
"id",
4
Let(
5
{
6
challengeRef: Ref(Collection("challenge"), Var("id")),
7
exists: Exists(Var("challengeRef")),
8
challenge: If(Var("exists"), Get(Var("challengeRef")), null)
9
},
10
Select("data", Var("challenge"), null)
11
)
12
)
13
)

That’s all of the custom functions we’ll need here.

Authentication integration

Although Fauna offers built-in identity and basic password authentication, it requires that you manage the user data yourself and does not provide features like prebuilt UI components, <UserProfile /> access, and other auth strategies such as OAuth social login and magic links. Clerk provides these features and more without the hassle of managing your own user and identity service.

The Clerk integration with Fauna enables you to authenticate queries to your Fauna database using a JSON Web Token (JWT) created with a JWT template.

From your Clerk dashboard, navigate to the JWT Templates screen. Click the New template button and choose the Fauna template.

New JWT template

Take note of the default template name of fauna (as this will come up later). You can leave the default settings and optionally add your own custom claims using convenient shortcodes.

Fauna JWT template

While keeping this tab open, go back to the Fauna dashboard and navigate to the Security page.

Click on the Roles tab and then create a New Custom Role. Name this role user and give it Read and Create access to the challenge collection as well as Call permission for both getChallenges and getChallengeById functions.

Create user role

If everything looks correct, click Save to create the user role.

Next, click on the Providers tab and click on the New Access Provider button.

Enter Clerk as the name to identify this access provider.

We’re going to play a little pattycake back-and-forth between Fauna and Clerk, but bear with me and we’ll get through it together.

  1. Fauna: Copy the Audience URL and go back to the Clerk JWT template tab.
  2. Clerk: Paste the Audience URL as the value for the aud claim.
  3. Clerk: Copy the Issuer URL.
  4. Fauna: Paste into Issuer field.
  5. Clerk: Copy the JWKS Endpoint URL.
  6. Fauna: Paste into the JWKS endpoint field.
  7. Fauna: Select the user role for access.
New access provider

After those fields have been set, you can save both the Clerk JWT template and Fauna access provider. Whew! That was fun.

Add Clerk auth to Remix

Now we can get back into building our application. Open the Remix project in your code editor of choice.

In Remix, app/root.jsx wraps your entire application in both server and browser contexts.

Clerk requires a few modifications to this file so the authentication state can be shared with your Remix routes. First, add these imports to app/root.jsx:

import { rootAuthLoader } from '@clerk/remix/ssr.server';
import { ClerkApp, ClerkCatchBoundary } from '@clerk/remix';

Second, export rootAuthLoader as loader taking in the args parameter.

export const loader = (args) => rootAuthLoader(args);

Next, we need to export the ClerkCatchBoundary as CatchBoundary to handle expired authentication tokens. If you want your own custom boundary, you can pass it in as the first argument.

export const CatchBoundary = ClerkCatchBoundary();

And finally, we need to wrap the default export with the ClerkApp higher-order component.

export default ClerkApp(function App() {
return (
<html lang="en">{/*[...]*/}</html>
);
});

That’s all that’s needed to install and configure Clerk for authentication. The next step will include adding sign in functionality.

Add SignIn to index route

We’re going to use the Clerk hosted <SignIn /> component to render the sign in form.

Update app/routes/index.jsx with the following:

app/routes/index.jsx
1
import { SignIn } from '@clerk/remix';
2
import styles from '~/styles/index.css';
3
4
export const links = () => {
5
return [{ rel: 'stylesheet', href: styles }];
6
};
7
8
export default function Index() {
9
return (
10
<div>
11
<main>
12
<div className="content">
13
<SignIn />
14
</div>
15
</main>
16
</div>
17
);
18
}

We’re using Remix’s route styles functionality to dynamically add a stylesheet to this route.

Create a styles directory inside of the app folder and save the following as index.css:

app/styles/index.css
1
@font-face {
2
font-family: "color-emoji";
3
src: local("Apple Color Emoji"),
4
local("Segoe UI Emoji"),
5
local("Segoe UI Symbol"),
6
local("Noto Color Emoji");
7
}
8
9
:root {
10
--font-body: "Segoe UI", Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, "Open Sans", "Helvetica Neue", sans-serif, color-emoji;
11
--color-error: #c10500;
12
--color-success: #15750b;
13
}
14
15
body {
16
margin: 0;
17
font-family: var(--font-body);
18
}
19
20
header {
21
position: relative;
22
z-index: 1;
23
display: flex;
24
align-items: center;
25
justify-content: space-between;
26
padding: 10px 20px;
27
background-color: #fd890f;
28
box-shadow: 0 2px 2px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
29
}
30
31
.actions {
32
display: flex;
33
align-items: center;
34
}
35
36
.actions > a {
37
margin: 0 20px;
38
color: #fff;
39
font-size: 14px;
40
text-decoration: none;
41
}
42
43
.actions > a:hover,
44
.actions > a:focus {
45
color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.8);
46
}
47
48
.logo {
49
color: #fff;
50
font-size: 22px;
51
font-weight: 600;
52
}
53
54
main {
55
display: flex;
56
height: calc(100vh - 56px);
57
}
58
59
aside {
60
width: 280px;
61
height: 100%;
62
overflow-y: scroll;
63
flex-shrink: 0;
64
background-color: #F5F5F4;
65
border-right: 1px solid #D8D8D4;
66
}
67
68
aside h2 {
69
margin: 20px 20px 10px;
70
font-size: 18px;
71
}
72
73
aside ul {
74
list-style: none;
75
padding: 0;
76
}
77
78
aside li {
79
font-size: 28px;
80
}
81
82
aside li:not(:last-child) {
83
border-bottom: 1px solid #D8D8D4;
84
}
85
86
aside li > a {
87
display: block;
88
padding: 8px 20px;
89
text-decoration: none;
90
}
91
92
aside li > a:hover,
93
aside li > a:focus,
94
aside li > a.active {
95
background-color: #ECECEA;
96
}
97
98
.content {
99
width: 100%;
100
height: calc(100vh - 40px);
101
padding: 40px 20px 0;
102
background-color: #e5e6e4;
103
text-align: center;
104
}
105
106
.content h1 {
107
margin-bottom: 8px;
108
}
109
110
@font-face {
111
font-family: "color-emoji";
112
src: local("Apple Color Emoji"),
113
local("Segoe UI Emoji"),
114
local("Segoe UI Symbol"),
115
local("Noto Color Emoji");
116
}
117
118
:root {
119
--font-body: "Segoe UI", Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, "Open Sans", "Helvetica Neue", sans-serif, color-emoji;
120
--color-error: #c10500;
121
--color-success: #15750b;
122
}
123
124
body {
125
margin: 0;
126
font-family: var(--font-body);
127
}
128
129
header {
130
position: relative;
131
z-index: 1;
132
display: flex;
133
align-items: center;
134
justify-content: space-between;
135
padding: 10px 20px;
136
background-color: #fd890f;
137
box-shadow: 0 2px 2px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
138
}
139
140
.actions {
141
display: flex;
142
align-items: center;
143
}
144
145
.actions > a {
146
margin: 0 20px;
147
color: #fff;
148
font-size: 14px;
149
text-decoration: none;
150
}
151
152
.actions > a:hover,
153
.actions > a:focus {
154
color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.8);
155
}
156
157
.logo {
158
color: #fff;
159
font-size: 22px;
160
font-weight: 600;
161
}
162
163
main {
164
display: flex;
165
height: calc(100vh - 56px);
166
}
167
168
aside {
169
width: 280px;
170
height: 100%;
171
overflow-y: scroll;
172
flex-shrink: 0;
173
background-color: #F5F5F4;
174
border-right: 1px solid #D8D8D4;
175
}
176
177
aside h2 {
178
margin: 20px 20px 10px;
179
font-size: 18px;
180
}
181
182
aside ul {
183
list-style: none;
184
padding: 0;
185
}
186
187
aside li {
188
font-size: 28px;
189
}
190
191
aside li:not(:last-child) {
192
border-bottom: 1px solid #D8D8D4;
193
}
194
195
aside li > a {
196
display: block;
197
padding: 8px 20px;
198
text-decoration: none;
199
}
200
201
aside li > a:hover,
202
aside li > a:focus,
203
aside li > a.active {
204
background-color: #ECECEA;
205
}
206
207
.content {
208
width: 100%;
209
padding: 40px 20px 0;
210
background-color: #e5e6e4;
211
text-align: center;
212
}
213
214
.content h1 {
215
margin-bottom: 8px;
216
}
217
218
.emoji {
219
display: block;
220
font-size: 80px;
221
line-height: 1.2;
222
margin: 20px auto 10px;
223
}
224
225
.error > p {
226
color: var(--color-error);
227
font-size: 18px;
228
}

Your app should now look something like:

If you see a blank screen, you may be already signed in. We will handle that case momentarily.

Inside of the app directory, create a folder called components and a file called header.jsx.

Drop in the following code:

app/components/header.jsx
1
import { SignedIn, UserButton } from '@clerk/remix';
2
3
export default function Header() {
4
return (
5
<header>
6
<span className="logo">Movie Emoji Quiz</span>
7
<SignedIn>
8
<UserButton />
9
</SignedIn>
10
</header>
11
);
12
}

Here we’re making use of the <SignedIn> control flow component and the <UserButton /> which will allow us to edit our profile and sign out.

Go back to app/routes/index.jsx and import the <Header /> component and add it just above the <main> element:

app/routes/index.jsx
1
import Header from '../components/header';
2
3
export default function Index() {
4
return (
5
<div>
6
<Header />
7
<main>
8
<div className="content">
9
<SignIn />
10
</div>
11
</main>
12
</div>
13
);
14
}

If you sign in, you should now see your avatar. Click on it to see the user profile menu.

You can now sign in, sign out, and manage your account. Clerk makes it super easy with their hosted components.

Authenticate with the Fauna client

In order to start fetching data from our Fauna database, we need to set up the Fauna client.

Create a utils folder inside of app and a file named db.server.js.

The .server naming convention is a hint to the compiler to ignore this file in the browser bundle.

Add the following code:

app/utils/db.server.js
1
import { getAuth } from '@clerk/remix/ssr.server';
2
import faunadb from 'faunadb';
3
4
export const getClient = async (request) => {
5
const { userId, getToken } = await getAuth(request);
6
7
if (!userId) {
8
return null;
9
}
10
11
const secret = await getToken({ template: 'fauna' });
12
13
return new faunadb.Client({ secret });
14
};
15
16
export const q = faunadb.query;

Here we are using the getAuth function from Clerk to check if we have a userId (e.g. if the user is signed in) and to get access to the getToken function, which when called with our Fauna JWT template name (it was simply “fauna” if you remember), will be passed to the Fauna client as the authentication secret.

If the user is signed in and we get access to the Fauna JWT template, we should then be able to make queries against our Fauna database.

We are also exporting q here, which is a convention when using faunadb.query. This way all our database helper functions are kept in the same place.

Display movie challenges

Now it’s time to display some of these challenges.

First let’s create a new route at /challenges. We do this by creating a file app/routes/challenges.jsx and populating it with the following:

app/routes/challenges.jsx
1
import { Outlet } from '@remix-run/react';
2
import Header from '../components/header';
3
import styles from '~/styles/index.css';
4
5
export const links = () => {
6
return [{ rel: 'stylesheet', href: styles }];
7
};
8
9
export default function Challenges() {
10
return (
11
<div>
12
<Header />
13
<main>
14
<div className="content">
15
<Outlet />
16
</div>
17
</main>
18
</div>
19
);
20
}

This should look the same as the index route, with the exception being <SignIn /> is replaced with the Remix <Outlet /> component.

Next, import the database utils we previous created and export a loader function with the below code:

import { getClient, q } from '../utils/db.server';
export const loader = async ({ request }) => {
const client = await getClient(request);
if (!client) {
return null;
}
const response = await client.query(q.Call('getChallenges'));
// Check your terminal for response data
console.log(response);
return json(response);
};

You can see we’re using the Fauna client to perform a FQL query to call the getChallenges function we created. If all went well, check your terminal window (not the browser console) and you should see the response data.

Create a new file app/components/sidebar.jsx that will loop over this data and create links to each challenge based on its ID.

app/components/sidebar.jsx
1
import { NavLink } from '@remix-run/react';
2
3
export default function Sidebar({ data }) {
4
return (
5
<aside>
6
<h2>Guess these movies...</h2>
7
<ul>
8
{data?.map(movie => (
9
<li key={movie.id}>
10
<NavLink to={`/challenges/${movie.id}`}>{movie.emoji}</NavLink>
11
</li>
12
))}
13
</ul>
14
</aside>
15
);
16
}

Import the <Sidebar /> component in the index route directly under the main element.

To access the data from the loader, we will use the aptly named useLoaderData hook from Remix and pass the data property to the Sidebar component:

export default function Challenges() {
const { data } = useLoaderData();
return (
<div>
<Header />
<main>
<Sidebar data={data} />
<div className="content">
<Outlet />
</div>
</main>
</div>
);
}

If you visit http://localhost:3000/challenges, you should now see the emoji challenges rendered as links in the sidebar:

Sidebar with links

If you click on the links, they will cause an error because we haven’t created those individual challenge routes. Let’s do that now.

Create challenge route

Let’s create a new stylesheet that will hold the challenge styles at app/styles/challenge.css.

app/styles/challenge.css
1
.emoji {
2
display: block;
3
font-size: 80px;
4
line-height: 1.2;
5
margin: 20px auto 10px;
6
}
7
8
.author {
9
padding-bottom: 10px;
10
color: #8a8a8a;
11
font-size: 14px;
12
}
13
14
form {
15
display: flex;
16
flex-flow: column wrap;
17
align-items: center;
18
justify-content: center;
19
margin-top: 20px;
20
}
21
22
label {
23
font-size: 18px;
24
font-weight: 600;
25
margin-bottom: 20px;
26
}
27
28
input[type="text"] {
29
min-width: 280px;
30
padding: 8px;
31
border: 1px solid #ccc;
32
font-family: var(--font-body);
33
font-size: 16px;
34
}
35
36
.submit-btn {
37
appearance: none;
38
margin-top: 40px;
39
padding: 12px 24px;
40
background-color: #7180AC;
41
border: 1px solid #6575A4;
42
border-radius: 4px;
43
cursor: pointer;
44
color: #fff;
45
font-family: var(--font-body);
46
font-size: 14px;
47
}
48
49
.submit-btn:hover,
50
.submit-btn:focus {
51
background-color: #6575A4;
52
}
53
54
.form-field {
55
display: flex;
56
align-items: baseline;
57
margin-top: 20px;
58
text-align: left;
59
}
60
61
.form-field label {
62
display: block;
63
min-width: 50px;
64
margin: 0 16px 0 0;
65
}
66
67
.form-validation-error {
68
color: var(--color-error);
69
font-size: 14px;
70
margin-top: 4px;
71
margin-bottom: 0;
72
}
73
74
.message {
75
margin: 8px 0 0;
76
font-size: 16px;
77
}
78
79
.message--correct {
80
color: var(--color-success);
81
}
82
83
.message--incorrect {
84
color: var(--color-error);
85
}
86
87
.reveal {
88
position: relative;
89
}
90
91
.reveal-btn {
92
position: relative;
93
z-index: 2;
94
appearance: none;
95
width: 300px;
96
margin: 24px auto;
97
padding: 16px 24px;
98
background: #F5F5F4;
99
border: 1px solid #D8D8D4;
100
transition: opacity 1.5s ease;
101
cursor: help;
102
font-family: var(--font-body);
103
font-size: 14px;
104
}
105
106
.reveal-btn:hover {
107
opacity: 0;
108
}
109
110
.reveal-text {
111
position: absolute;
112
top: 40px;
113
left: 0;
114
width: 100%;
115
font-size: 14px;
116
}

Next, create a file inside a folder at the path app/routes/challenges/$id.jsx

The $ prefix is important here as it creates a dynamic segment.

Add the following code:

app/routes/challenges/$id.jsx
1
import { json } from '@remix-run/node';
2
import { useLoaderData } from '@remix-run/react';
3
import { getClient, q } from '../../utils/db.server';
4
import styles from '~/styles/challenge.css';
5
6
export const links = () => {
7
return [{ rel: 'stylesheet', href: styles }];
8
};
9
10
export const loader = async ({ params, request }) => {
11
const client = await getClient(request);
12
13
if (isNaN(params.id)) {
14
throw new Response('Challenge not found', {
15
status: 404
16
});
17
}
18
19
const challenge = await client.query(q.Call('getChallengeById', params.id));
20
21
if (!challenge) {
22
throw new Response('Challenge not found', {
23
status: 404
24
});
25
}
26
27
return json(challenge);
28
};
29
30
export default function Challenge() {
31
const { emoji } = useLoaderData();
32
33
return (
34
<div>
35
<span className="emoji">{emoji}</span>
36
</div>
37
);
38
}

This code follows a similar pattern to what we did in the sidebar with the loader and the useLoaderData hook. The difference here is we’re calling the getChallengeById FQL function and passing it the id parameter, which comes from the $id dynamic route.

We are also using a Remix convention of throwing Response objects for error scenarios (e.g. invalid ID, challenge not found).

If you click on the links in the sidebar, you should now see each emoji challenge rendered in its full glory (a large type size).

Emoji challenge route

Challenge form

Now it’s time to add the form to submit guesses for the emoji challenges. Form handling is one area where Remix really shines.

Add the following form markup below the emoji:

<form method="post" autoComplete="off">
<label htmlFor="guess">What movie is this?</label>
<input
id="guess"
type="text"
name="guess"
placeholder="Enter movie title..."
required
/>
<button className="submit-btn">Submit guess</button>
</form>

This is pretty standard JSX form markup. Nothing too fancy going on here.

Let’s import our DB utils as well as the json Response helper from Remix.

import { json } from '@remix-run/node';
import { getClient, q } from '~/utils/db.server';

Then export the following action function:

export const action = async ({ params, request }) => {
const form = await request.formData();
const guess = form.get('guess');
const client = await getClient(request);
const challenge = await client.query(
q.Call('getChallengeById', params.id)
);
const isCorrect = guess.toLowerCase() === challenge.title.toLowerCase();
return json({
guessed: isCorrect ? 'correct' : 'incorrect',
message: isCorrect ? 'Correct! ✅' : 'Incorrect! ❌',
answer: challenge.title
});
};

Here we’re using native FormData methods to read the guess input and comparing it against the challenge title we get by calling our FQL getChallengeById function with the challenge ID from the route params.

Based on whether the guess matches the title (case insensitive), we return an appropriate JSON response. We can access the action data using the useActionData hook (also aptly named).

import { useActionData, useLoaderData } from '@remix-run/react';

Now we can update the UI to display the correct message based on the guess submitted.

export default function Challenge() {
const { emoji } = useLoaderData();
const data = useActionData();
return (
<div>
<span className="emoji">{emoji}</span>
<form method="post" autoComplete="off">
<label htmlFor="guess">What movie is this?</label>
<input
id="guess"
type="text"
name="guess"
placeholder="Enter movie title..."
required
/>
{data?.guessed ? (
<p className={`message message--${data.guessed}`}>{data.message}</p>
) : null}
<button className="submit-btn">Submit guess</button>
{data?.guessed === 'incorrect' ? (
<div className="reveal">
<button className="reveal-btn" type="button">
Reveal answer
</button>
<span className="reveal-text">{data?.answer}</span>
</div>
) : null}
</form>
</div>
);
}

If an incorrect guess is submit, we provide the user a way to reveal the answer.

Reveal answer for incorrect guess

The form should now work to submit correct and incorrect guesses.

Handling transitions

Because the form is shared between different challenge routes, if you enter text in one input and go to another challenge, you will see the input value is not being cleared.

We can fix this by using the useTransition hook, putting a ref on the form element, and then resetting the form when the transition is a normal page load.

export default function Challenge() {
const { emoji } = useLoaderData();
const data = useActionData();
const transition = useTransition();
const ref = useRef();
useEffect(() => {
if (transition.type == 'normalLoad') {
// Reset form on route change
ref.current && ref.current.reset();
}
}, [transition]);
return (
<div>
<span className="emoji">{emoji}</span>
<form ref={ref} method="post" autoComplete="off">
<label htmlFor="guess">What movie is this?</label>
<input
id="guess"
type="text"
name="guess"
placeholder="Enter movie title..."
required
/>
{data?.guessed ? (
<p className={`message message--${data.guessed}`}>{data.message}</p>
) : null}
<button className="submit-btn">Submit guess</button>
{data?.guessed === 'incorrect' ? (
<div className="reveal">
<button className="reveal-btn" type="button">
Reveal answer
</button>
<span className="reveal-text">{data?.answer}</span>
</div>
) : null}
</form>
</div>
);
}

You will need to add the necessary hook imports from React and Remix.

import { useEffect, useRef } from 'react';
import { useActionData, useLoaderData, useTransition } from '@remix-run/react';

After that is added, the form should clear when choosing a different challenge.

Submit new challenges

This app is not much so much fun if users can’t submit their own movie emoji challenges. So that’s the functionality we’re going to add now.

As with most things in Remix, the first thing we need to do is create a new route.

Create app/routes/challenges/new.jsx with the following:

app/routes/challenges/new.jsx
1
import { getAuth } from '@clerk/remix/ssr.server';
2
import { json, redirect } from '@remix-run/node';
3
import { Form, useActionData } from '@remix-run/react';
4
import { getClient, q } from '~/utils/db.server';
5
import styles from '~/styles/challenge.css';
6
7
export const links = () => {
8
return [{ rel: 'stylesheet', href: styles }];
9
};
10
11
const badRequest = data => json(data, { status: 400 });
12
13
const validateEmoji = emoji =>
14
!emoji.trim() || /\p{L}|\p{N}(?!\uFE0F)|\p{Z}/gu.test(emoji)
15
? 'Please enter only emoji'
16
: undefined;
17
18
const validateTitle = title =>
19
title && title.length > 1 ? undefined : 'Please enter a movie title';
20
21
export const action = async ({ request }) => {
22
const form = await request.formData();
23
const emoji = form.get('emoji');
24
const title = form.get('title');
25
26
if (typeof emoji !== 'string' || typeof title !== 'string') {
27
return badRequest({
28
formError: 'Form not submitted correctly.'
29
});
30
}
31
32
const fieldErrors = {
33
emoji: validateEmoji(emoji),
34
title: validateTitle(title)
35
};
36
37
if (Object.values(fieldErrors).some(Boolean)) {
38
return badRequest({
39
fieldErrors,
40
fieldValues: {
41
emoji,
42
title
43
}
44
});
45
}
46
47
const { userId } = await getAuth(request);
48
const client = await getClient(request);
49
const data = {
50
emoji,
51
title,
52
userId
53
};
54
55
const response = await client.query(q.Create('challenge', { data }));
56
57
return redirect(`/challenges/${response.ref.value.id}`);
58
};
59
60
export default function NewRoute() {
61
const actionData = useActionData();
62
63
return (
64
<div>
65
<h1>Create new challenge</h1>
66
<Form method="post" autoComplete="off">
67
<div className="form-field">
68
<label htmlFor="emoji">Emoji</label>
69
<input id="emoji" type="text" name="emoji" />
70
</div>
71
{actionData?.fieldErrors?.emoji ? (
72
<p className="form-validation-error" role="alert" id="name-error">
73
{actionData.fieldErrors.emoji}
74
</p>
75
) : null}
76
<div className="form-field">
77
<label htmlFor="title">Movie</label>
78
<input id="title" type="text" name="title" />
79
</div>
80
{actionData?.fieldErrors?.title ? (
81
<p className="form-validation-error" role="alert" id="name-error">
82
{actionData.fieldErrors.title}
83
</p>
84
) : null}
85
{actionData?.formError ? (
86
<p className="form-validation-error" role="alert">
87
{actionData.formError}
88
</p>
89
) : null}
90
<button className="submit-btn">Submit challenge</button>
91
</Form>
92
</div>
93
);
94
}

This time we’re using the Form component provided by Remix, which helps with automatically serializing the values. There’s validation logic to check for valid emoji and titles. If the validation passes, we create a new challenge. We use the getAuth function from Clerk to send in the user ID along with the emoji and title. These values form the data for a new challenge document in Fauna. On a successful document creation, the user is redirected to the new challenge page.

Let’s add a link to the header so we can get to this page. It’s wrapped with <div className="actions"> to provide the necessary styling.

app/components/header.jsx
1
import { SignedIn, UserButton } from '@clerk/remix';
2
import { Link } from '@remix-run/react';
3
4
export default function Header() {
5
return (
6
<header>
7
<span className="logo">Movie Emoji Quiz</span>
8
<SignedIn>
9
<div className="actions">
10
<Link to="/challenges/new">Submit challenge</Link>
11
<UserButton />
12
</div>
13
</SignedIn>
14
</header>
15
);
16
}

Clicking the link should take you to the page where you can create a new challenge. You should see validation errors if you don’t fill out the form properly.

New challenge validation error

Once submitted, you will be redirected to the new challenge page. Because the action created a new mutation, Remix will automatically update the data in the sidebar. Neat!

New challenge link appears in sidebar

You now have a working Movie Emoji Quiz app. If you’re ready to share it with your family and friends, Remix makes deployment very easy and has support for various deployment targets. Using the Vercel CLI, all you need to deploy your Remix app is run:

npm i -g vercel
vercel

And your app will be live within minutes!

Next steps

To take this app even further, you can do the following:

  • Add catch boundaries and redirects to handle error cases and invalid challenge routes
  • Create Remix routes for /sign-in and /sign-out to use mounted Clerk components
  • Use the Clerk User API to query the username for each user user-submitted challenge so you can give them credit for their cleverness
  • Keep track of correct guesses and display an indicator in the UI so the user knows which challenges they have yet to tackle

If you enjoyed this tutorial or have any questions, feel free to reach out to me (@devchampian) on Twitter, follow @ClerkDev, or join our support Discord channel. Happy coding!

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